Daily Read (5/11/16)

I hadn’t realized that Olivia Colman’s character in The Night Manager was a man in the novel – I’m a Le Carre fan but haven’t gotten to that one yet – but this piece about that change is interesting.

Mafia show Gomorrah (based on the book by Roberto Saviano) hasn’t made it to the U.S. yet – soon; it’s coming to Sundance TV – but it’s been renewed for seasons three and four in Italy, so we have that to anticipate.

They’re trying to adapt Locke & Key YET AGAIN. Honestly, I don’t know much about it – I’m not really a comics person – but there have been so many abandoned adaptation attempts that my reaction is pretty much “Oh, that again.”

Ooh, this sounds interesting: There’s an event series adaptation in the works of Jonathan Eig’s nonfiction book The Birth of the Pill, about Margaret Sanger, Katharine McCormick, Gregory Goodwin Pincus, and John Rock.

Shirley MacLaine and Matthew Broderick will star in the TV adaptation of George Hodgman’s family memoir Bettyville.

Daily Read (5/2/16)

Hulu is making a The Handmaid’s Tale series starring Elisabeth Moss!

Netflix and the BBC are doing a Watership Down miniseries with the voices of John Boyega and James McAvoy and Olivia Colman and and and!

USA Network’s Queen of the South (based on Arturo Perez-Reverte’s novel) will premiere on June 21st.

Ooh, Max Greenfield and Sarah Snook have been cast in The Glass Castle.

Ugh. Do we really need a movie based on Andrew Wakefield’s book about vaccines and autism? (No. No we do not.)

TV Recommendation: The Night Manager

The Night ManagerMiniseries The Night Manager, based on the novel of the same name like John Le Carre, finally premiered in the U.S. on AMC last night. If you missed it, you can find it on demand or in one of several reruns this week, and if you like spy stories I strongly suggest you check it out. It’s got a great cast, led by Tom Hiddleston, Hugh Laurie, Olivia Colman, and Tom Hollander, and its British run got rave reviews. The first episode was quite enjoyable and I’m looking forward to more.

I’m a Le Carre fan in general, though I haven’t read this novel yet, and while almost all modern adaptations are a bit flashier and more action-y than the original novels, I liked that this kept some Le Carre flavor. Le Carre does bureaucracy brilliantly, and the drama around the copy machine, for example, was strikingly reminiscent of the tense scenes of file retrieval in Tinker Tailor. On the other hand, while I understand why the writers of the show moved it forward in time to incorporate the Arab Spring, I sort of wish they’d left it in the post-Cold War early nineties, because that’s also a very specific and interesting moment in history to explore.

Here’s a taste for you:

Did you watch the premiere? What did you think?